Quick Answer: What Is A Persistent Cough A Sign Of?

How do I know if my cough is serious?

Go to the doctor if you’re coughing up thick green or yellow phlegm or if you’re wheezing, running a fever higher than 101 F, having night sweats, or coughing up blood.

These may be signs of a more serious illness that needs treatment..

When should I worry about a persistent cough?

See your doctor if your cough persists for more than three weeks or you get other symptoms like shortness of breath, chest pain or coughing up blood. Likewise, if you have a long-term chest condition like asthma or COPD, you need to contact your doctor if the cough has made these symptoms worse.

What does it mean if you have a persistent cough?

Dozens of conditions can cause a recurrent, lingering cough, but the lion’s share are caused by just five: postnasal drip, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), chronic bronchitis, and treatment with ACE inhibitors, used for high blood pressure.

Why do I have a cough that won’t go away?

Causes of a lingering cough Some other causes of an ongoing cough include: Chronic allergies, hyperactive gag reflex, and acid reflux can create a prolonged irritation in your throat and cause an ongoing cough. Certain types of medications, especially blood pressure drugs, carry a side effect of coughing.

How long is too long to have a cough?

Most of the time, a cough is acute, or temporary. Most acute coughs last around 3 weeks or less. Sometimes, a cough may last longer than 3 weeks, becoming subacute or chronic. This can be due to a postnasal drip, the effects of an infection, or an underlying health condition.

When should I be concerned about a cough?

Call your doctor if your cough (or your child’s cough) doesn’t go away after a few weeks or if it also involves any one of these: Coughing up thick, greenish-yellow phlegm. Wheezing. Experiencing a fever.